Lumen

The Catholic Gift to Civilisation

How Catholics gave the modern world so many things that we now take for granted

By: Holden , Fr Marcus / Pinsent, Fr Andrew

Format: A6 Paperback

Dimensions: 10.5cm by 14.8cm

ISBN : 9781860827259

Number of Pages: 112

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Publication Date: 26 Jan 2011

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Product Code: EV6

£2.95

In a recent debate, broadcast worldwide by the BBC, over 87% of the audience rejected the motion that the Catholic Church is a force for good in the world. To set the record straight, this booklet summarises the extraordinary fruitfulness of the faith, noting that our university system, art, music, legal tradition, charity and even much of our science arises from Catholic civilisation and Catholic minds. This booklet is a great source of encouragement for Catholics and is ideal for those engaged in apologetics, evangelism and teaching today, and for anyone wishing to investigate further.

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Anonymous

13/07/2016

Page for page, no work of Catholic apologetics could possibly pack as much punch per pica as this 100-page booklet written by two English priests. Need convincing that the Church underlies our entire civilization? Read this little book, organized as a mini-Catechism.

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Anonymous

04/07/2016

This book sets out to rebut the commonly held view that the Catholic Church is opposed to science and 'progress'. It tells the story of the contributions that Catholics and the Church in general have made to Western civilization, morality and ideas. It is packed with practical stories and examples - including that of Georges LeMaitre, the Catholic priest whose theory of the big bang underpins modern cosmology. The book is short and easy to read.

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Anonymous

04/07/2016

With remarkable clarity and conciseness, this small book is a treasure trove of information about the enormous and grossly overlooked contribution of the Catholic Church to the promotion of culture, social justice and trhe common good underpinned by Faith. It is an easy and comprehensive tool to enable one to grasp the depth and range of so much is owed to our Christian roots. It also enables one to search more deeply the topics that are so well presented. It takes amazing skill and scholarship to cover so much ground so compactly. It is ideal as a gift for people who are ignorant of the subject as it is very reader friendly.

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Anonymous

04/07/2016

Excellent brief tour through the history of contributions to civilisation from Catholics, Church-supported organisations and the Church itself. It covers not just the arts -as would be expected- but charity, law, language, science and more. Did you know, for instance, that the Church created the university system across Europe in the early Second Millennium, and was responsible for the first schools? That Nicolaus Copernicus was a Catholic priest? That Galileo's daughter chose to become a nun? That Gregor Mendel, the founder of the science of genetics, was a monk? That Georges Lemaître, the originator of Big Bang Theory, was a Catholic Priest? Along with more on science and philosophy we see that the Church is responsible for the nature of the legal system across much of the world, and that our Western concepts of individual persons and human dignity originate with Catholicism. In addition to its intended purpose for instructing those interested in becoming Catholics, this makes an superb precis for the general reader. But I must end with a caution about using this for apologetics. If someone argues against Christianity that it has been responsible for a lot of evil in history, it would be fatal for the Christian to respond by regurgitating the facts from this pamphlet. Instead of accepting the antagonist's terms -upon which he will never be convinced- the Christian must dispute them. It is not Christianity that has been responsible for evil in history, but particular *people and institutions*, some of whom happened to be affiliated to Christianity, or even cited the religion as an excuse for their actions. That they have done bad things is not in question, but it does nothing towards proving that Christianity is false. Likewise, the Christian must not, on pain of inconsistency, approach the non-Christian and argue for the truth of Christianity based upon the good things that particular Christians and Christian institutions have done in the past.